Eyes As Big As Plates

What connection can we maintain to nature when the jungles we inhabit are increasingly made of concrete? It is a question artists Karoline Hjorth and Riitta Ikonen have been exploring…

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Bureau Of Memories

Through the largest of Bethlem Hospital’s remaining apple orchards, over badger sets, and past a light pole on which kestrels are often seen perching, can be found a wood pile…

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Timorous Beasties

“You don’t go to art school to do wallpaper design. There’s no such thing.” How you become a wallpaper designer, Paul Simmons explains — or at least, how he did — is “by default”…

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Lasting Impressions

Thomas Edison was a prolific inventor. At the time of his death in 1931, he had more than 1,000 US patents to his name; 2,000+ if you count those he held around the entire world…

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A Growing Galaxy

In the summer of 2016, the Milky Way doubled in size. By which we mean, the number of stars it was previously believed to contain was found to be only about half what it actually contains…

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Dedication + Perseverance = Success

Michael Faraday is proof positive that dedication and perseverance pay off. Faraday — physicist, chemist, and founder of the UK Royal Institution’s famous Christmas science lectures — was only educated until the age of 13…

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Score 1: Women

‘He managed to become a CEO without sacrificing his masculinity.’ That’s not a sentence anyone is likely to come across in their daily readings. But the same is not true when considering the opposite sex…

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X Marks The Spot

This is a tale of two halves. It begins around the turn of the 20th century, with the establishment of a new private printing press near the banks of the Thames…

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Photographic Revolution

Edwin Herbert Land was a visionary scientist and inventor who 70 years ago changed the picture-taking habits of people around the world, the result of which is still felt today…

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Can’t Touch This

In the editorial we made mention of the lovely Edixion Offset 110gsm uncoated paper Issue 2 of the magazine is printed on… you can feel the tangible texture of it…

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Kepler’s Cosmic Cup

There was a time when astrology and astronomy were not so scientifically, diametrically opposed. A time when Johannes Kepler wrote horoscopes for the royal court while also writing requests…

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Witches Brew

The general knowledge of women’s role in the invention of beer, and the establishment of the industry around it, has largely been lost to the hands of time, and…. witch-hunters?…

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Alpha, Gamma, Aha!

A flash of insight might feel like a spontaneous, instantaneous revelation, but experts say they can see signs that something is brewing several seconds in advance…

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Get Stuffed

Some say it’s macabre, others that it’s a second chance at life. Whatever your views on taxidermy, it is a practice that is inextricably linked with natural history collections and museums…

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Oh Coffee, How We Do Love Thee

Britain is in love with a little brown bean called coffee. And it’s an affair that dates back more than 350 years to the edge of a churchyard in St Michael’s Alley…

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Hallucinogenic Books

Libraries can expand your mind in more ways than one. A leading London mycologist has claimed that old books, particularly those stored in less than perfect conditions, can provide inspiration…

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Petrichor

The natural world is full of gods, goddesses and other mythological creatures, in name, if not spirit. For nomenclature convention draws heavily on the Greek and Roman classics when labelling new species…

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Pyramid Of Death

In the 1820s, the tallest building in London was St Paul’s Cathedral, at 111 metres high. But architect Thomas Willson had grander plans. In 1829 he proposed to build a massive granite pyramid…

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